Articles by Laura Barrera

cotton growing

Surviving Pigweed Death Struggle with No-Tilling and Cover Crops

On the verge of bankruptcy from herbicide-resistant weeds, Adam and Seth Chappell discovered they could control weeds and slash inputs by embracing conservation practices.
Back in 2009, Adam Chappell was at the end of his rope. Trying to control pigweeds on the 9,000-acre farm he shares with his brother, Seth, in Cotton Plant, Ark., was a constant fight. They were making 15 trips across the field in per growing season with sprayers and various tillage equipment, spending anywhere from $100-$200 an acre on weed control.
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Undercutting: Kills Resistant Weeds Without Disturbing Soil Residue

If herbicide-only weed control plans are becoming less effective and more expensive, no-tillers may consider using this minimum tillage tool to keep challenging weeds in check.
When herbicides just won’t kill your weeds anymore — and the cost of multiple herbicide applications is no longer economical — what do you do?
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Land Rolling Can Drum Up Benefits, ROI for No-Tillers

No-tillers using land rollers to prevent rock damage, improve seed-to-soil contact and smooth fields say the operation is worth the effort.
If you ask Colby Johnson about his decision to invest in a land roller, he’ll tell you he wishes he had made the purchase sooner rather than later.
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Four Major Impacts Mycorrhizae Has on No-Till Crops

‘Beneficial’ may not be what no-tillers think of fungi, but arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi is capable of protecting and nourishing plants, leading to higher yields for less cost.
Just underneath the soil surface are thousands of microorganisms, playing an important role not only in the soil, but the success of the crops planted into them.
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Saved Sediment, Covers, Worms Bring No-Till ‘Gold’ to the Surface

Dwight Clary says seeding covers have revved up his Ohio farm by suppressing weeds, taking up nutrients and building organic matter.
An interest in conservation hit Dwight Clary early in life. When he was 13 years old, one of his 4H projects won a County Conservation Award. The prize? A week at Conservation Camp. That was when he learned about a new practice called “no-till.”
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