Residue Management

Residue Management

Valuable how-to tips and information about managing tough no-till residue in all types of climates and conditions, whether it’s stalks, stems, chaff or straw.

ARTICLES

Getting More Dollars Per Acre With No-Till, Covers and Livestock

David Wessel’s recipe for no-till success lets him wring out profits from poorer ground and lean on covers and healthier soil to raise corn, soybeans and wheat more economically.
David Wessel isn’t afraid to make the most out of every no-till acre, whether it’s rich, black gumbo, timber or sandy soils, or anything in between.
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Undercutting: Kills Resistant Weeds Without Disturbing Soil Residue

If herbicide-only weed control plans are becoming less effective and more expensive, no-tillers may consider using this minimum tillage tool to keep challenging weeds in check.
When herbicides just won’t kill your weeds anymore — and the cost of multiple herbicide applications is no longer economical — what do you do?
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Turn Stubborn Piles of Residue Into Cash for No-Till Soils, Crops

Biological residue digesters on the market can help no-tillers saddled with not-so-perfect soil biology recycle their crop stover and stubble faster to improve nutrient management.
Highly functioning no-tilled soils should, in theory, efficiently break down crop residue into humus and soil organic matter so plants can take up nitrogen (N), potassium and phosphorus (P) left by the decayed material for the next crop.
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Frank Comments

Same Old Conservation Ideas, Just New Words to Describe Them

While there’s increasing emphasis on “sustainable agriculture” and “soil health,” these four buzzwords tend to ruffle the feathers of veteran no-tillers and others like myself who have followed the no-till movement for nearly a half century. It’s because we recognize that earlier generations of no-tillers were the original true innovators behind these “not-so-new” concepts that go back to the 1960s.
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IMAGE GALLERIES

Scenes from the Palouse

Back in 2010, No-Till Farmer editor Frank Lessiter and his son, Mike, traveled to the Palouse area of eastern Washington to visit John Aeschliman, who’s been successfully no-tilling in the region for more than 40 years. Named one of the 25 No-Till Living Legends, no-till has allowed Aeschliman to successfully farm in an area that receives as little as 12 inches annual moisture and has slopes as steep as 60%.

Click on the articles below to learn more about Aeschliman’s operation.

No-Till Works Under Tough Conditions

What I’ve Learned from No-Tilling: Do More With Less!

 

PRODUCTS

NNTC16 Audio Presentations

How to Manage Corn Residue While Keeping it From Leaving Your Fields - Marion Calmer - NNTC 2016 Presentation - MP3 Download

$19.95

Managing corn residue without it leaving your no-till fields is becoming a challenging task from the time of fall harvest to next year’s crop canopy. Because managing corn residue starts at harvest, in this presentation Marion Calmer discusses the mechanical impact that chopping corn heads, different styles of stalk rolls, stubble stompers and vertical tillage have on planting down pressure, clean seed trenches and how residue flows through planters. The western Illinois no-tiller also reviews the pros and cons of sizing corn residue, along with the economic impact it has on soil temperatures, soil moisture, earthworm populations, nutrient release, nitrogen tie-up and, ultimately, yield response.

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NNTC 2015 Speaker Presentation

Combine Settings To Manage No-Till Residue, Harvest Top Yields - Marion Calmer - NNTC 2015 Presentation - MP3 Download

$19.95

Marion Calmer takes corn harvest seriously. The no-tiller from Alpha, Ill., knows a properly adjusted combine will allow him to harvest every kernel possible, but he needs to process residue so he can no-till next year’s crop with limited interference from last year’s trash.

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NNTC 2015 Speaker Presentation

How To Manage The Breakdown Of Crop Residue - Doug Miller - NNTC 2015 Presentation - MP3 Download

$19.95

Undecayed corn stalks and other plant residue can lead to disease and insect infestations, soils slow to warm in the spring, volunteer corn and challenges for planting equipment and seedling emergence. And while residue provides protection to soils, it’s a source of valuable nutrients to the following crop when released properly.

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