Cover Crops

cover crop planting dry.jpg

Cover Crop Considerations for Dry Conditions

Cover crops can offer a number of benefits to a cropping system including increased biodiversity, crop/livestock integration, erosion control, or water management. One of the greatest risks to cover cropping is failure to establish, and in North Dakota that often is the result of insufficient moisture. What can be done to reduce the risk of cover cropping?


Read More
grazing-allows-more-value-from-cover-crops.jpg

The Impact of Grazing Cover Crops on Soil Health

Cover crops are typically used by producers in dryland no-till cropping systems to improve soil health, reduce soil compaction, enhance nutrient cycling, improve soil structure, and improve water infiltration. Producers may be able to realize some income from cover crops by grazing or haying them. But is this a good idea or will it cancel out any benefit the cover crops would otherwise have on soil properties and residue cover?


Read More
Angus-based-commercial-cattle-grazing.jpg

Cashing in with Cover Forages Between No-Till Wheat Crops

Oklahoma no-tiller squeezes in a profitable late-summer, early-fall grazing period on cover crops he sows immediately behind his combine. The practice adds $100-150 per acre in cattle gains.
Northwestern Oklahoma no-tiller Jimmy Emmons quit plowing 10 years ago to begin rebuilding his soils and says by adding diverse cover crop mixes to his operation over the same period he’s cut his farm’s overall purchased fertilizer use by 85%.
Read More
Bergler-Family.jpg
What I've Learned from No-Tilling

Getting by with Less is Giving this No-Tiller More to Cheer About

Reducing tillage, slashing nitrogen, cutting seed treatments and opting for untraited corn have savings adding up and profits peaking.
I wanted to no-till. I would search out no-till planters online or in classified ads and just wish. But with only 240 acres, I just couldn’t justify the expense — at least not until a supportive friend stepped in.
Read More
image_3777_1_2_1_262_1_23_1_28_2_11_2_2_2_38_1_94_7_2_24_46_6_414_49_21_45_2_25_15_1_9_1_18_9_6_5_1_21_3_29_8_2_1_13_5_1_9352.jpeg

Penn: Consider Early Kill for 2022 Non-Legume Covers

When a cover crop is terminated, the fresh residue is broken down by microbes in the soil. These microbes use N and other key nutrients found in the cover crop residue as fuel sources for the break-down process. However, if there is not enough N in the residue to complete the process, microbes will use N from the soil instead.
Read More
corn-in-hv2.jpg

Three Ways to Reduce Nitrogen Loss

Nitrate leaching is a major concern in coarse-textured agricultural soils because it can cause economic losses for farmers and contaminate groundwater. While some nitrate leaching may be inevitable when growing corn on sandy soils, there are several management strategies that can be implemented to limit nitrate loss. Here are some key takeaways from a recent five-year study looking at three major factors impacting nitrate leaching: drainage, nitrogen availability, and cropping system.
Read More
red-clover_Edwin-Remsberg-USDA-SARE.jpeg

Alfalfa, Red Clover can Furnish N for Following Crops

Legumes still can provide valuable N to today’s cropping systems. Legumes also contribute a non-nitrogen rotation effect due to addition of soil organic matter and improvement in soil health. Corn grown following alfalfa stands that are 2+ years old (and contained at least 50% alfalfa) require no nitrogen fertilizer on many soils. Red clover N credits are less than for alfalfa.


Read More

Top Articles

Current Issue

Cover_CTG_0223.jpg

No-Till Farmer

Get full access NOW to the most comprehensive, powerful and easy-to-use online resource for no-tillage practices. Just one good idea will pay for your subscription hundreds of times over.

Subscribe Now

View More

Must Read Free Eguides

Download these helpful knowledge building tools

View More
Top Directory Listings