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We’re excited to bring you this unique, one-of-a-kind learning experience assembling the best no-tillers, agronomists and researchers together in one location to share cutting-edge ideas, techniques and strategies to raise your level of no-till profitability, efficiency and efficacy.

 
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JUST A FEW OF THE NO-TILL AUTHORITIES TO SPEAK...

 

DON’T MISS THESE HIGHLY EDUCATIONAL PRE-CONFERENCE WORKSHOPS:

James-Hoorman

Courting the Two ‘M’s’ that Make or Break Your Soil’s Biological System

Tiny organisms play a powerful role in building productive no-till soils, but a lot still must be learned about the specific players in the system and how to maximize their presence and effectiveness. Two of these invaluable organisms are metarhizium and mycorrhizal fungi and they’re both essential to your soil resource, says Jim Hoorman.

In this exclusive workshop, the former NRCS educator and owner of Hoorman Soil Health Services will introduce metarhizium fungi and define its role as a soil health parasite to over 200 insect species and recycler of soil nitrogen. Hoorman will also outline the importance of mycorrhizal fungi functions, report on what mycorrhizae species are present in the soil and which ones are needed to improve agricultural production, as well as discuss ag products that are harmful or helpful to establishment of these fungi in no-till systems.

Steve-Groff

How No-Tilling Hemp Could Add to Your Operation’s Bottom Line

Legal changes in the most recent Farm Bill approved by Congress created a burgeoning market in the U.S. for hemp, which can be grown for both fiber and CBD products. But raising this specialty crop is much different than traditional row crops, whether you’re talking about seeding practices, genetics, harvest methods or dealing with the legal requirements, says Holtwood, Pa., no-tiller Steve Groff.

In an exclusive 2-hour workshop from 10 a.m. to noon on Jan. 7, Groff will share his early experiences raising 70 acres hemp for the CBD market and provide attendees with an understanding of what’s required to break into this market, the equipment and fertility requirements, and what mistakes to avoid. He’ll even share how cover crops can be incorporated with hemp plants to facilitate soil health and provide nutrients for optimal growth.

 
David-Johnson

GENERAL SESSION

Regenerating Soil Microbiomes for Improved Farm Productivity, Profitability
Microbes played a significant role not only in development of our planet, but in formation of the soils used to produce food that feeds the world’s population. Disruptions of these soil microbiomes can have serious consequences for both farming and mankind — but the good news, says David Johnson, is that microbiomes can be restored.

The molecular biologist at New Mexico State University’s Institute for Sustainable Agricultural Research will share results of greenhouse and field research that helped him devise the Biologically Enhanced Agricultural Management (BEAM) system which promotes regenerative practices to help no-tillers further ratchet up soil health indicators and improve crop yields and profitability.

CLASSROOM

Boosting Biomass and Crop Production with a Super-Charged Compost Inoculant 
With the ever-increasing prices seen for synthetic inputs pressuring margins, many no-tillers are looking for cheaper, more efficient ways to fertilize cash crops, including composted products that stimulate soil microbiomes to enhance plant growth and production.

Molecular biologist David Johnson and his wife, Hui-Chun Su Johnson, will discuss the process they used to created a fungal-dominant, biologically diverse compost inoculant to jump start soil biology and increase biomass production. They’ll also highlight design, construction, care and feeding of the bioreactor used to create the inoculant, and preferred application methodologies for the product.


 
James-Hoorman

WORKSHOP
JANUARY 7, 2-5 P.M.

Courting the Two ‘M’s’ that Make or Break Your Soil’s Biological System 
Tiny organisms play a powerful role in building productive no-till soils, but a lot still must be learned about the specific players in the system and how to maximize their presence and effectiveness. Two of these invaluable organisms are metarhizium and mycorrhizal fungi and they’re both essential to your soil resource, says Jim Hoorman.

During this special workshop, the former NRCS educator and owner of Hoorman Soil Health Services will introduce metarhizium fungi and define its role as a soil health parasite to over 200 insect species and recycler of soil nitrogen. Hoorman will also outline the importance of mycorrhizal fungi functions, report on what mycorrhizae species are present in the soil and which ones are needed to improve agricultural production, as well as discuss ag products that are harmful or helpful to establishment of these fungi in no-till systems. This workshop has limited capacity and costs just an additional $99.00 to attend. Sign up during online conference registration or by calling (262) 432-0388 or (866) 839-8455 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

CLASSROOM

The Biology of Soil Compaction and Safeguarding Your No-Tilled Soils 
Most no-tillers know compaction problems adversely affect soil and plant health, but avoiding it might have been a challenge for many growers last year with all the wet weather. There’s a science to how compaction forms in soils and understanding that can help no-tillers handle this challenge more successfully, says Jim Hoorman. The former NRCS educator and soil health consultant will examine how soil texture and soil organic matter influences soil structure and soil compaction and review impacts of soil compaction on agricultural production and the environment. He’ll also share how roots and soil biology improve aggregate stability and reduce soil compaction, and apply soil health concepts to improve aggregate stability, reduce nutrient and water runoff and improve yields.


 
Paul-Overby

GENERAL SESSION

Taking No-Till Another Step: New Directions, Opportunities with Regenerative Agriculture
Through 15 years of no-tilling a variety of crops and adding cover crops to his Wolford, N.D., operation, Paul Overby has seen plenty of rewards. But an even bigger decision came when he began to raise oats for General Mills food products. That started his deep-dive into “regenerative agriculture” on the 1,900-acre farm that he co-owns with his wife Diane.

The farmer, owner of Verdi-Plus and president of Northern Plains Resource Conservation and Development Council, will discuss his transition from successful no-tilling to regenerative ag and how he’s using cropping patterns, covers, livestock and other tools to build soil organic matter and unlock available nutrients in the soil profile. He will also share the current state of regenerative ag and the opportunities waiting for no-tillers.

CLASSROOM

Putting Dollars and Cents to the Value of Healthy No-Tilled Soils
Many no-tillers believe their farm ground should be more valuable than conventionally tilled fields because of improved soil organic matter levels, nutrient cycling, water-holding capacity and the like. But farmland appraisers typically don’t see it that way. And if no-tillers believe their soils are worth more, would they pay more to rent or buy land with better soil health?

To bring this issue to the forefront, Wolford, N.D. no-tiller Paul Overby will share some insights from his own research and number-crunching — and a survey of hundreds of fellow farmers — while studying in the University of Wisconsin’s master’s program in Sustainable Management. Come with your thinking caps on — this discussion about the worth of healthy soils should be a lively one!

 

 
Roberto-Peiretti

GENERAL SESSION

The Road to Continuous No-Till and Enhanced, Efficient and Profitable System Performance
No-tillers today must farm into a globalized and competitive world trying to meet ever-growing demand for agricultural products — all while becoming more and more efficient, meeting environmental goals and staying profitable, says long-time no-tiller and consultant Roberto Peiretti.

A founding member of the Argentinian no-till farmers association AAPRESID and a co-founder of Bioceres, Peiretti will share the main principles of his systemic approach to no-tilling honed over the past 40 years in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. He’ll explain the benefits of integrating crop rotation, cover crops, carbon farming and fertilizer use and placement to create an efficient, high-powered no-till system. Peiretti, who farms with his wife Cintia, will also provide a glimpse of no-till adoption progress and benefits obtained in South America.

CLASSROOM

Solving the Riddle of Cover Crops and Fertilizer Management
Simply just getting cover crops established on farms can be a challenge. But many no-tillers complain it’s even harder to quantify the effect covers are having on soil nutrients and make the right decision on adjusting fertilizer applications to ensure cash crops still have the nutrients they need.

Veteran no-tiller and farm consultant Roberto Peiretti of Argentina will share some valuable tips and insights on measuring the nutrients and biomass cover crops contribute to the soil profile and what mistakes no-tillers should avoid making when deciding on possible reductions in fertilizer application. The founder of AAPRESID, the Argentinian no-till farmers association, will also share some tips related to the impacts of improved soil health and answer questions attendees might have about no-till innovations and developments in other regions of the world.

 

 
Jason-Mauck

GENERAL SESSION

Capturing and Harnessing Sunlight and Carbon with the Constant Canopy System
When no-tiller Jason Mauck isn’t driving a tractor or sprayer, he’s busy driving innovation on his 3,000-acre operation near Gaston, Ind. Ever the tinkerer and futurist when it comes to farming, Mauck endeavors to capture as much sunlight and carbon as possible through his system of relay intercropping cash crops and cover crops, and integration of manure from his 25,000 wean-to-finish pigs.

Mauck will share the components of his Constant Canopy system that he’s building upon to raise high-yielding corn, soybeans and wheat, which allows him to capitalize on crop synergies, improve soil health and suppress weeds for a more profitable and sustainable farm operation for his family and future generations.

 

 
Steve-Groff

WORKSHOP
JANUARY 7, 10:00 A.M.- Noon.

How No-Tilling Hemp Could Add to Your Operation’s Bottom Line 
Legal changes in the most recent Farm Bill approved by Congress created a burgeoning market in the U.S. for hemp, which can be grown for both fiber and CBD products. But raising this specialty crop is much different than traditional row crops, whether you’re talking about seeding practices, genetics, harvest methods or dealing with the legal requirements, says Holtwood, Pa., no-tiller Steve Groff.

During this special workshop, Groff will share his early experiences raising 70 acres hemp for the CBD market and provide attendees with an understanding of what’s required to break into this market, the equipment and fertility requirements, and what mistakes to avoid. He’ll even share how cover crops can be incorporated with hemp plants to facilitate soil health and provide nutrients for optimal growth. This workshop has limited capacity and costs just an additional $99.00 to attend. Sign up during online conference registration or by calling (262) 432-0388 or (866) 839-8455 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

GENERAL SESSION

Cover Cropping Around the World in 45 Minutes!
Just like in the U.S., Steve Groff has found no-tillers, min-tillers and strip-tillers in Canada, South Africa, Australia and numerous European countries are turning to cover crops to improve soil health and protect their fields against wind and water erosion.

The Holtwood, Pa., no-tiller and Cover Crop Coach will take attendees on a whirlwind virtual tour of these countries and share the innovative methods growers are using to get cover crops established on their farms — including clever equipment adaptations that make them work. Groff will also highlight concerns about glyphosate availability European growers have faced and alternative termination methods they’re adopted.

 

 
Mike-Bredeson

GENERAL SESSION

Farm Like an Architect: Interseeding Covers to Build Beneficial Insect Communities
Have you ever seen a pest outbreak in the prairie? There is an interesting phenomenon that takes place in highly diverse plant communities, says Mike Bredeson, as an ecosystem supported by diversity is more resilient to different types of disruptions from herbivores, diseases and even extreme weather. Interseeding adds to diversity of farmland and influences many other agronomic factors, such as weed control, nutrient cycling and water infiltration. But how can growers replicate the resiliency of natural habitats — such as prairies — on their own farms?

Backed by data and his experiences in the field, the research scientist at the Estelline, S.D.-based Ecdysis Foundation will take attendees on a deep dive into how interseeding covers affects insect communities and how beneficial invertebrates react when we interseed cover crops into what would otherwise be a monoculture.

CLASSROOM

Insecticidal Seed Treatments: How Do They Work and Where Do They Go?
Neonicotinoid seed treatments are so common that it can be difficult for no-tillers to find seed without it. But, Mike Bredeson asks, have growers have ever stopped to wonder how seed treatments really work or where it goes once their seed has been planted? And how do neonicotinoid insecticides really kill an insect?

The research scientist at the Ecdysis Foundation will discuss insecticide research that will be of interest to any no-tillers thinking about interseeding cover crops, or those concerned whether insecticides might be protecting their herbicide-resistant weeds from beneficial insects.

 

 
Andrew-Reuschel

CLASSROOM

A Multi-Faceted Approach to a Profitable No-Till System
Simply adopting no-till on the family farm wasn’t enough for Andrew Reuschel. His passion for improving soil health and profitability has morphed into a multitude of cropping systems and soil amendments utilized on the 1,400-acre operation that his family has farmed for more than 125 years.

The Golden, Ill., no-tiller and participant in the Soil Health Partnership will share how he’s evolved his whole-farm system, which includes interseeding cover crops and companion cropping, planting bio-strips and using a compost-tea extract in furrow to boost fertility levels for corn and soybeans. He’ll also briefly share some of the input efficiencies and cost savings he’s realized through conservation practices.

 

 
Andrew-Reuschel

CLASSROOM

How to Develop ‘Actionable Items’ for Better No-Tilling Through Aerial Imaging
For Dan and Brian Sutton, the key to managing their 1,300-acre no-till operation lies in what they can see from the sky, not just from the ground. The brothers from Lowell, Ind. developed ADVI technology, which is based on traditional NDVI but allows for thermal imaging of the soil, not just vegetation. They also specialize in long-wave thermal imaging, and hold several patents associated with its use in agriculture.

The brothers from Lowell, Ind., and proprietors of AirScout will share how they use this technology and the timeliness of drone and airplane imaging for scouting operations that helps them build planting and application prescriptions, make tile and drainage decisions, detect pest and disease pressure, organize and evaluate test strips and more.

 

 
Aaron-Augustian

CLASSROOM

Building a More Sustainable, Profitable No-Till Dairy Operation
For Aaron Augustian, running a dairy farm the traditional way isn’t the answer any more. Through the help of various agencies and partners they’re establishing several new conservation practices that are making their 1,100-acre operation more profitable and environmentally sustainable.

The Kewaunee, Wis., grower — who with his brother Todd manages 1,200 cows and young stock and participates in the Door-Kewaunee Watershed Demonstration Farm Network — will share how they’ve successfully implemented no-till and cover crop practices on their farm, including interseeding alfalfa into corn. Aaron will also share the results of their cover crop and low-disturbance manure application program and comparative data they’ve generated with a water-monitoring station as they seek mitigate the risk of groundwater and surface water contamination.

 

 
Jason-Bond

EARLY BIRD BREAKFAST GENERAL SESSION

Assessing SDS, SCN Threats to No-Tilled Soybeans and Finding Profitable Strategies and Solutions
Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) and soybean cyst nematode (SCN) continue to be leading causes of yield declines and crop failures in soybeans across the Midwest, posing a major challenge to no-till profitability in an already challenging economic environment, says Jason Bond.

At the Early Bird Breakfast sponsored by Syngenta, the plant pathologist at Southern Illinois University will provide an overview of what happened with SDS incidents in 2019 and discuss how a combination of host resistance and seed treatments impacts the disease — as well as outline the best methods to deal with this pathogen in the future. He’ll also cover the linkage between SCN and SDS and offer some perspectives on why this combination continues to challenge to both farmers crop protection industry even though the compounds to fight them are still effective.


 
Josh-Payne

Getting to the ‘How and Why’ on No-Tilling Green
With ever-tightening planting windows, farmers must consider how to effectively establish cash crop stands while maintaining soil structure and building soil health and nutrient availability. ‘Planting green’ into a living cover crop can alleviate some of those issues, but it comes with its own set of challenges, says Josh Payne.

The Concordia, Mo., no-tiller of 800 acres of corn, soybeans, wheat and chestnuts will share the “how and why” of planting green, including both the successes and failures he’s seen along the way. He’ll also share the multiple strategies and planter setups he and his neighbors have tried to make this dynamic no-till planting system successful.

 

 
Jeff-Martin

GENERAL SESSION

Banking on Soil Biology for Better No-Till Yields and Profits
Jeff Martin and family are doing a lot of adding and subtracting these days as they work to boost soil health and productivity and log a more robust balance sheet for their farm. Does raising high-yielding no-tilled corn with only 50 units of nitrogen sound unrealistic? It can be done, he says.

The Mount Pulaski, Ill., no-tiller and strip-tiller will outline how his family reshaped their input program with broadcast and in-furrow application of a high-performing compost-like product that helped them eliminate phosphorus and potassium applications and focus attention on micronutrient applications and other yield-responsive practices. They’ll also explain how utilizing cover crops by planting green or interseeding is boosting soil biology even further as they work to improve fungi-to-bacteria ratios in their soils.

CLASSROOM

Tips and Tweaks for Raising High-Yielding Strip-Tilled Corn
The challenges of strip-tilling corn aren’t lost on Jeff Martin, but he and the family have devised a comprehensive plan involving both their machinery and input management to keep corn yields high and input costs low while managing stubble as necessary.

Martin will outline how they use a vertical-tillage tool and Ortho seeder to manage corn stubble and seed cover crops after harvest to rejuvenate fields ahead of the next growing season. He’ll also describe the setup and reasoning for their John Deere strip-till bar and cover various precision upgrades made recently to their planter to get the best results for strip-tilled corn.

 

 
Ray-Ward

Understanding Soil Tests for Optimal No-Till Nutrient Needs
Productive soils are paramount to a high-yielding, efficient no-till system. But ascertaining and interpreting what traditional soil nutrient tests and newfangled soil biology tests are showing can be a tough chore, says Ray Ward.

The owner of Ward Laboratories will compare standard soil tests and the Haney test and discuss what the optimum levels are and when low scores on these tests should be a concern to no-tillers. He’ll also cover some basics on nutrient removal rates and the importance of maintaining proper soil nutrient levels.

 

Questions about the National No-Tillage Conference?

Contact No-TIll Farmer
by phone at (866) 839-8455
or (262) 432-0388
by fax at (262) 786-5564

or by email at
info@no-tillfarmer.com

To learn about sponsorship opportunities contact Darrell Bruggink
at (262) 777-2420 or
dbruggink@lessitermedia.com

To learn about group attendance discounts contact Dallas Ziebell
at (262) 777-2412 or
dziebell@lessitermedia.com

Mail to
P.O. Box 624
Brookfield, WI 53008-0624

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