Residue Management

no-tillage conference

Deepen Your No-Till Knowledge at the NNTC Summer Intensive

Bridge the educational experience of our National No-Tillage Conferences with this 2-day virtual learning program, June 23-24, covering organic no-till, increasing irrigation ROI with precision technology, correctly setting up your combine for residue management, learning more about plant sap analysis, and more.
Bridge the educational experience of our National No-Tillage Conferences with this 2-day virtual learning program, June 23-24, covering organic no-till, increasing irrigation ROI with precision technology, correctly setting up your combine for residue management, learning more about plant sap analysis, and more.
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no-till vegetables
No-Till Passport Series

No-Till Works with Veggies

Bill Kerr, a vegetable specialist and breeder of a range of vegetables, has been no-tilling for 18 years and says he’s seen a range of benefits. Conservation practices can build soils up to a point where you can realize maximum yields, higher water-holding capacity, greater disease resistance, better eelworm control and better-tasting vegetables with longer shelf life. The No-Till Passport series is brought to you by Martin Industries.
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Frank Lessiter, No-Till Farmer Editor

For Every $1 of Government Funding Invested in No-Till Research and Education, Western Canadian Growers, Suppliers and Consumers Earned $109 in On-Going Benefits

With a new administration taking over in Washington, climate change is going to get much more attention. In fact, the new presidential team has already committed to helping farmers expand the use of no-till, cover crops and carbon sequestration in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
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Breaking Through to the ‘Root’ Cause of Compacted Soil

Soil compaction can limit yields, cause flooding and runoff and limit nutrient uptake in plants. But breaking up compacted soils with iron is not the answer, according to soil health consultant Jim Hoorman — biology is.
Soggy fields and heavy grain carts are a common combination in fall, and can lead to deeply rutted and compacted fields. And it’s no joke. Soil compaction can reduce yields by up to 60% and it’s been shown to persist for up to 9 years, according to Jim Hoorman.
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