Items Tagged with 'DAP'

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Less is More: No-Tillers Weigh in on Nitrogen Management Methods

A survey of no-tillers uncovers a range of application and management practices — plus uses of precision data and cover crops — that help provide optimal crop yields and cut input costs in no-till operations.
Nitrogen (N) management plans are about as variable as the timing and application options available to today’s no-till farmers. Not only is careful consideration given to the types and amounts of N applied, but the use of precision data gathering equipment also enables growers to gauge their success on the fly and take corrective actions as required.
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Tips For Getting More From Your ‘P And K’

Building healthier no-till soils, frequent soil testing and other readily available products and practices can help no-tillers stretch their fertility dollars further, regardless of their application system.
The price tag for phosphorus and potassium is way too high for no-tillers to allow nutrients to tie up, float away or just plain not do their job effectively.
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Matching Nitrogen Rates To Strip-Till Profitability

Through research, Minnesota strip-tiller David Legvold and college senior Emma Cornwell found the most profitable rate of sidedressed liquid 28% isn’t always the highest rate.
Ever since David Legvold began farming land owned by St. Olaf College at Northfield, Minn., about 9 years ago, he’s worked with university professors and students to document the impacts of tillage and crop inputs on profitability, soil health and water quality.
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Tune Up Your Strip-Till Fertilizer Program

Strip-tillers share how they boost fertilizer efficiency by varying rates and mixing up timing, placement and equipment.
Whether they’re veterans or rookies, six strip-tillers across the U.S. are paying close attention to their fertilizer programs to maximize profitable production of corn, soybeans and other crops
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Foul Fall Likely Means More Spring-Applied Fertilizer

A late harvest, poor weather and high prices mean more no-tillers will be looking to apply more fertilizer this spring than usual.
Fertilizer was a painful input for most no-tillers in 2008. Growing world demand (up 14% — a growth equal to the entire U.S. market, according to The Fertilizer Institute), high production costs, increased transportation expense and a faltering U.S. dollar all contributed to record-high prices for major nutrients.
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