Items Tagged with 'deep'

ARTICLES

Cover Crops, Freeze-Thaw Cycle Favored For Undoing Compaction

An online discussion finds that most no-tillers prefer not to rip their fields and would rather rely on more natural methods to restore the structure of their valuable soils.
No-tillers forced to work in wet fields this fall after heavy rains might want to know that most experienced no-tillers favor the freeze-thaw cycle and cover crops rather than tillage to break up compacted soil.
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Dare to Compare

This farmer matches his conversation system to varying soil types
Tim Manchester was nonchalantly looking over yield maps when the clusters of dots representing yields glowed as brightly as a K-Mart blue light special.
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What I've Learned from No-Tilling: After Nearly 25 Years, Improvements Still Keep Coming

An open mind welcomes a lot of ideas that, with a little tweaking, can deliver even more success to your fields.
Talk to 10 no-tillers and you’ll probably hear 10 slightly different viewpoints on why it pays to quit disturbing and start building the soil. At Sheridan Farms, we’ve got our list, too. We’ve been able to drop from five marketed crops to two or three without any loss in productivity or farm income.
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Compaction Can Threaten Unsuspecting No-Tillers

Just because you’re no-tilling doesn’t mean a hardpan can’t undermine all your cropping efforts from the roots up.
No-tillers know the threat that compaction poses to their crops. And although no-tilling minimizes the risk of compaction, no-tillers might not understand how a hardpan might still sneak into their fields.
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What I've Learned From No-Tilling: Continuous No-Till Really Does Pay

While 23 percent of the country’s total cropland is now being no-tilled, less than 12 percent has been continuously no-tilled for more than 5 years.
If I had to pick out one consistent thing about no-tilling that I have observed over and over, it is that most no-till benefits come with continuous no-till — season to season and crop to crop. That’s the message I delivered last winter to attendees at the 2005 National No-Tillage Conference just a few days after I retired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. And it’s the message I would like to expand upon as a private consultant: It’s time for the no-till community to aim higher.
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What I've Learned from No-Till: They Went Cold Turkey With No-Till

New no-tillers can count on making fewer trips across the field and spending less for less labor and fuel, but you’ll be devoting more time to management.
In the Mid-1980s, we switched from moldboard plowing to a conservation farming system of chisel plowing, discing and planting. It was the recommended soil saving system of the time, but we seemed to be stuck in place.
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Use Deep Zone-Tillage To Farm Vertically

Higher yields can result from getting crop roots to grow deeper in your no-tilled fields.
"If you want to double the size of your farm, farm vertically,” says Ray Rawson. The developer of several pieces of zone tillage equipment and a no-till corn and soybean producer from Farwell, Mich., for many years has taken the time to look beneath the soil surface. The result has been higher yields on his own and and many other farms.
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Stripping! Ripping!

A veteran no-tiller who’s definitely been successful with both no-tilled corn and soybeans is Dean Holst of Le Claire, Iowa. He’s been so successful that he expected to no-till 5,000 acres of corn and soybeans this spring.
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