Cover Crops

What I've Learned From No-Tilling: 30 Years Of Cover Crops Anchor No-Till System

Sharp increases in organic matter and vasity reduced fertilizer cost are just a couple of the benefits that David Brandt has realized on his Ohio farm.
When I planted my first cover crop — cereal rye — in 1978 to control erosion on poorly drained, hilly clay soils, I had no idea what the full ramifications of that decision would be. Since then, cover crops have become the anchor of a diverse crop rotation in our continuous no-till system.
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No-Tilling With A Sense Of Determination

Changes to manure handling, cover crops and planter modifications have Pennsylvania no-tillers finding success in shallow clay shale soils.
When it comes to no-tilling around Gettysburg, Pa., it’s quite a battle for Ed and Dan Wilkinson. While some of the land these no-tillers farm is where the most famous battle of the Civil War was fought, the battle for the Wilkinsons is taming the soils that make the transition to no-till tough.
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Cereal Rye Before Soybeans Helps Balance Moisture

Southern Illinois no-tiller successfully drills soybeans into cereal rye standing more than 5 feet tall.’
It may seem improbable and even Terry Dahmer admits his neighbors have thought it a bit unusual, but each spring you’ll find the Marion, Ill., no-tiller pulling a soybean drill through fields of cereal rye about 5 feet tall.
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Build Organic Matter With Diverse Cropping Rotations

Continuous no-till, along with winter wheat, field peas, proso millet and a CANULA cover crop, raised organic-matter levels and led to better water infiltration for this Nebraska no-tiller.
Randy Rink used to have the typical Midwestern crop operation. He rotated corn and soybeans. With this 2-year rotation, Rink would disc corn stalks once in the fall, and plant soybeans in the spring. The next year, he would no-till corn into soybean residue.
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What I've Learned From No-Tilling: Preserving The Fertile Soils Of The Palouse

Going 100% no-till in 1997 has placed Read Smith in position to help lead the effort to protect the fragile farmland of eastern Washington.
We're no doubt biased, but my family and I think there are few more breathtaking views of production agriculture than seen from the highest point of our farm in the Palouse region of eastern Washington. In midsummer, flowing fields of crops — which may include wheat, canola, barley, sunflowers, mustard, alfalfa, peas and lentils — stretch across the hills to the horizon.
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