Articles Tagged with ''fields''

Some of Your Friends Live Underground

Earthworms can accomplish a lot in undisturbed fields, and no-tillers are in perfect position to capitalize, says this speaker at the 2006 National No-Tillage Conference.
Field scouting usually happens in broad daylight. But to scout for one indicator of the vitality of your no-till fields, it’s best to step out after dark, or dusk at earliest. Then look for earthworms.
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Take the Next Step With Mature No-Till Fields

Long-term no-tillers earn rewards from improved soils, but they also face new questions as they try to make the most of their evolving fields.
Dan Gillespie wonders if long-time no-tillers are taking full advantage of the improvements in their soils. Gillespie, a continuous no-tiller in Meadow Grove, Neb., for the past 15 years, is putting his own soils to the test and sharing his answers.
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What Should You Charge The Neighbors?

Facing higher input costs, more farmers than ever are taking a closer look at no-till. While there may be numerous opportunities for you to no-till more acres in your area while adding dollars to your checkbook, there’s no easy answer as to what you should charge for no-tilling, spraying or other work done in a neighbor’s fields.
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Rotary Harrow Makes Good No-Till Tool For Seeding Cover Crops

These machines have caught the eye of no-tillers because they only work the top inch or so of soil without causing major soil disturbance.
An unexpected Phillips rotary harrow was a good fit this year for Foundation Feeders, located near Spring Grove, Minn. Jim Holty, a partner with his brother Ron in the custom heifer raising service, won a year’s use of the harrow at the 2004 National No-Tillage Conference in Des Moines. Jim manages the agronomy side of the business while Ron concentrates on the livestock operation.
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Diseases Travel Over "Green Bridge" To Quietly Steal No-Till Yields

Pathogens feed on dying plants then live long enough to prey on newly planted crops1
The so-called “green bridge” could be stealing yields from no-till fields without the growers’ knowledge. The green bridge is the method by which soil and foliar pathogens feed on cover crops, weeds or volunteer crops and survive long enough to infect a new season’s cash crops.
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More Carbon, No-Till Corn

Although previous studies have indicated significant carbon losses from plowing, a new Agricultural Research Service study indicates that there may not be a huge loss if a farmer plows only once.
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