Items Tagged with 'Mark Alley'

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Increased Nitrogen Rates May Lead to More Acid Soil Concerns

Experts explain how soil sampling by layers and effective liming can help no-tillers overcome the ‘additive’ effect on soil acidity.
Concerns among no-tillers about the impact of high nitrogen (N) rates on soil acidity appear to be on the increase. And it’s more of a problem with continuous no-till since some growers are spreading less lime due to increasing soil organic matter and decomposition.
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Examine Application Methods To Get The Most From Fertilizer

No-tillers who utilize tissue sampling, band fertilizers, scout for nutrient deficiencies and know the limitations of their soil types can squeeze more bushels of corn from productive no-till soils.
While there are plenty of tools available today for no-tillers to grow high-yielding corn, failure to use all of them can cause corn yield to be left on the table.
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Finding The Fertility ‘Gold Mine’ After A Dry Year

No-tillers could save inputs costs and raise yields by accessing residual nutrients in fields, but they need relevant data and must understand the factors that affect nutrient availability.

No-Tillers whose fields were ravaged by drought last year will face some crucial decisions this spring as they investigate nutrient levels in their fields


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In Continuous No-Till, Banding Starters Makes You Money

Placing nutrients near the seed gets corn off to a fast start and avoids losses or tying up of nutrients from broadcast applications.
Banding is good. Virginia Tech agronomist Mark Alley explains to no-tillers the reasons for banding nutrients, like nitrogen and phosphorus, near the seed during a break at the 16th annual National No-Tillage Conference.
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Wondering About No-Till Wheat!

If you've been struggling with no-till wheat, you may be pulling your hair out looking for answers. These no-tillers explain what's new, what's coming and why it can be down-right confusing.
When it comes to perfecting no-till crop practices, it seems like corn and soybeans have made the most progress. They’ve got genetically altered seed and specialized chemicals. They’re continually tinkering with planters and drills, hoping to create the ideal machine. But what about wheat?
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