Items Tagged with 'Corn stalks'

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[Webinar] The Dollars and Cents of Residue Breakdown

During this webinar, Doug Miller, agronomist and vice president of Midwest Bio-Tech, helps you understand the fertility value of the nutrients in crop residue and how the residue decay process affects your bottom line. This FREE webinar is brought to you by the Midwest Bio-Tech. [To view any of our webinar replays, you must be logged in with a free user account.]
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A Winning Formula To Break Down Tough Residue

Agronomist says a mixture of 28%, Thio-Sul, humates, sugar and water can help digest today’s tough corn stalks for better corn yields the following year.
Corn residue has its good and bad points. It’s not so good if it interferes with no-till seed placement or crop emergence, but it’s a great source of food for soil biological activity and contains valuable nutrients for the next year’s crop.
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No-Till Tradition, Passion For Change Fuel Miller Farms

Wisconsin no-tillers make use of cover crops, gypsum, winter wheat and precision ag to enhance soil biology and bump up no-till yields.
Five years ago, Nick and Luke Miller returned to Miller Farms near Oconomowoc, Wis., bringing with them a passion for change that works well with the no-till tradition their father, Bob, began 16 years ago.
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Tips To Avoid Tire Damage From Stubble

Corn stalks and stubble are causing damage to agricultural equipment tires that range from sidewall cuts and punctures to chipping of large tractor tires. In some cases damage can be so severe it may require the farmer to replace tires.
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“Strip-Twinning” Toward 300-Bushel Corn

Twin-row, strip-tilled continuous corn is helping Illinois farmer John Obery pursue his goal of growing the highest yields possible, but the system demands a great deal of ingenuity and patience.
Conventional wisdom at the coffee shop says John Obery’s twin-row, strip-tilled continuous corn won’t work and conventional tillage is the way to farm. But the Metamora, Ill., strip-tiller, who began farming in 1973, sets his own course.
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