Items Tagged with 'twin-row corn'

ARTICLES

Twin Rows, Covers and Chicken Litter Complete an Evolving No-Till System

The Kutzes have continually tweaked their equipment and practices to achieve a level of production they didn’t think was possible.
About 10 years ago, Dennis and John Kutz needed to trade planters and decided it was time to try something new. So the Fort Atkinson, Wis., father-and-son operation purchased a 12-row Great Plains planter and gave 30-inch twin rows a try.
Read More

Twin-Row Corn Sees Small Yield Bump

Twin-row corn is becoming more of an attractive production practice for growers across the Midwest, but the jury is still out in Ohio on its yield potential, according to Ohio State University Extension research.
Read More

Cutting-Edge Planting And Seeding Equipment

Options, flexibility and precision are hallmarks of the new planters and drills unveiled at the 2009 Farm Progress and Big Iron shows
The rapid rise in the cost of seed and fertilizer in the past year served as a wake-up call for no-tillers, reminding them that controlling input costs is often the difference between being profitable or not.
Read More

What I've Learned From No-Tilling: Continuing Education Helps Make Transition To No-Till Seamless

During a 3-year transition to twin-row silage corn, alfalfa, double-cropped wheat/soybeans and cover crops, these Pennsylvania no-tillers have seen steady yield increases and soil improvement.
We live in an area of Lancaster County, Pa., where small dairy farms of 50 to 60 cows are common and fields are small. Many of the farms are Amish-owned, where real horses provide the power.
Read More

Twin-Row Corn Provides Boost

Modified John Deere planter allows no-tillers to plant rows 8 inches apart on 30-inch spacings.
Making the transition to no-till was a big step for Lapp Brothers Farms in making their soils more productive. But to get even more yield and tonnage out of corn silage meant taking a narrower view.
Read More

Residue Management Drives Corn Head Developments

The trend to continuous corn, twin-row corn and Bt hybrids is shifting the task of managing increased residue to the corn head.
It used to be that the primary task of a corn head was to harvest corn: separate the ear from the stalk with as little grain loss as possible, while collecting as little trash as possible, says Marion Calmer, a no-till farmer with Calmer Corn Heads in Alpha, Ill. But as growers look to better integrate field operations, the corn head is playing an increasingly important role in managing crop residue as well.
Read More

Top Articles

Current Issue

Cover_NTF_October_1019_198w.jpg

No-Till Farmer

Get full access NOW to the most comprehensive, powerful and easy-to-use online resource for no-tillage practices. Just one good idea will pay for your subscription hundreds of times over.

View More

Must Read Free Eguides

Download these helpful knowledge building tools

View More
Top Directory Listings