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Take Two Cuts In One Pass

This Washington producer added a second cutter for more effective management of small grains residue.
As Ron Kile began to study how no-till would fit into his farming operation, he had one lingering concern: residue management.
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Equipment Upgrades Possible Through Sharing Arrangements

Newer, bigger, more advanced equipment becomes available when you join with other no-tillers in clearly defined agreements covering costs and use.
Kenny Holsing faced a bit of a quandary. The De Witt, Neb., no-tiller needed a combine upgrade, yet he hoped to gradually ease back a bit. “I’m getting close to retirement,” Holsing says, “and I have only about 400 acres.”
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Organic No-Tillers Find Suitable Markets For Their Crops

Several successful organic vegetable growers in southeastern states are combining the benefits of cover crops, reduced tillage and smart marketing. Here’s a brief look at two family operations that have been guided by the work of pioneering researchers such as Virginia Tech’s Ron Morse (see accompanying story). Both families are active participants in the Southern Sustainable Agriculture Work Group (SSAWG), a 12-state, non-profit organization.
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What I've Learned from No-Tilling: After Nearly 25 Years, Improvements Still Keep Coming

An open mind welcomes a lot of ideas that, with a little tweaking, can deliver even more success to your fields.
Talk to 10 no-tillers and you’ll probably hear 10 slightly different viewpoints on why it pays to quit disturbing and start building the soil. At Sheridan Farms, we’ve got our list, too. We’ve been able to drop from five marketed crops to two or three without any loss in productivity or farm income.
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Take the Next Step With Mature No-Till Fields

Long-term no-tillers earn rewards from improved soils, but they also face new questions as they try to make the most of their evolving fields.
Dan Gillespie wonders if long-time no-tillers are taking full advantage of the improvements in their soils. Gillespie, a continuous no-tiller in Meadow Grove, Neb., for the past 15 years, is putting his own soils to the test and sharing his answers.
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What I've Learned From No-Tilling: Finding No-Till’s Weakest Link Is Essential

Having just one problem in a no-till system is enough to cause serious problems and it can happen at any time — even after 20 years of no-tilling.
When you think about being directly involved with saving a natural resource as significant as the Chesapeake Bay, it’s hard not to get excited. That noble thought might be enough reason all by itself to really hard sell continuous no-till systems, including cover crops and rotations. And when you can see clearly that no-till makes farming more profitable — in addition to the big-picture environmental equation — you can start to sense that we’re onto something, as they say, that’s really big.
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What I've Learned From No-Tilling: Continuous No-Till Really Does Pay

While 23 percent of the country’s total cropland is now being no-tilled, less than 12 percent has been continuously no-tilled for more than 5 years.
If I had to pick out one consistent thing about no-tilling that I have observed over and over, it is that most no-till benefits come with continuous no-till — season to season and crop to crop. That’s the message I delivered last winter to attendees at the 2005 National No-Tillage Conference just a few days after I retired from the Natural Resources Conservation Service. And it’s the message I would like to expand upon as a private consultant: It’s time for the no-till community to aim higher.
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