Items Tagged with 'soil erosion'

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Uganda degraded fields
No-Till Passport Series

‘Going Nuclear’ on Soil Erosion Losses in Uganda

The livelihoods of millions of Uganda citizens is rooted in the highlands — the mountainous or elevated regions of the East African country. These regions play a significant role in agriculture, which is the main source of income for many Ugandans, including for 70% of working women. These regions are also recognized as one of the key hotspots where land degradation, due to soil erosion, is rampant. The No-Till Passport series is brought to you by Martin Industries.
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Can We Talk About Climate Change? Here is What We Agree On

As someone who has now clocked over thirty years of working with farmers and ranchers (and agriculture organizations) on multiple natural resource issues and policies, I can tell you from my experience that people’s opinions on climate change seem to break down roughly into one of four categories.
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John Dobberstein 2

Do We Still Only Have 60 Harvests Left?

With the passing of National Ag Day last week, we celebrate what’s been done to improve the sustainability of farming operations, but look ahead to what we must do to preserve and protect food security for future generations.
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[Podcast] Cutting Inputs, Growing Liquid Corn and Sequestering Carbon with Russell Hedrick

In this episode of the <em>No-Till Farmer</em> podcast, brought to you by Yetter Mfg., we’re joined by Russell Hedrick who talks about how his experience as a young first-generation farmer faced with soil erosion led him on the path to using no-till, cover crops, incorporating livestock, and more.
In this episode of the No-Till Farmer podcast, brought to you by Yetter Mfg., we’re joined by Russell Hedrick who talks about how his experience as a young first-generation farmer faced with soil erosion led him on the path to using no-till, cover crops, incorporating livestock, and more.
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Carbon Loss Proportional to Tillage Intensity

Soil scientist Don Reicosky says the more soil you disturb in tillage, the more CO2 is released. In addition, he says tillage is detrimental to fungi-to-bacteria ratios that are vital to carbon and nitrogen storage.
Retired USDA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) soil scientist Don Reicosky of Minnesota admits he’s prejudiced against conventional farming and the moldboard plow because of their effects on soil organic matter (SOM)
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Frank Comments

Making a Case for Winter Canola

With low grain prices and a declining wheat acreage, Guy Swanson believes winter canola could replace a considerable amount of the winter wheat grown in the western U.S. The result could be higher incomes for no-tillers, bonus opportunities for turning out a high-quality product and a dramatic reduction in soil erosion.
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