No-Till Farmer editors encounter a variety of articles, social media posts, podcasts and videos that offer a unique look at no-tilling across North America and the world. Here is our favorite content from the past week from across the web:


Best of the Web This Week is brought to you by Sound Agriculture.

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SOURCE by Sound Agriculture wakes up the soil microbiome so you can access more nitrogen and phosphorus from your field. This bioinspired chemistry fixes atmospheric nitrogen and unlocks phosphorus that is tied up in the soil. It’s like caffeine for microbes, working with the soil you’ve already got to make your season more productive. Learn more at www.sound.ag.


Ontario No-Tiller Not Afraid to Till Because ‘We Farm in Reality’

Warren Schneckenburger aims to get his operation to 100% no-till, but he says corn can be a challenge in eastern Ontario. In this episode of RealAgriculture’s Soil School 2022, Schneckenburger says he uses strip-till and conventional tillage if he needs to because “we farm in reality … our clays can be pretty unforgiving here.” However, he’s still a proponent of no-till and planting green for improving his overall soil health.


No-Till Helps Oklahoma Farmer Improve Water Management

Matt Steinert raises corn, soybeans and wheat in Enid, Okla., a region that averages 30-32 inches of rainfall annually. No-till and other reduced tillage methods are crucial to Steinert’s moisture management, as the residue makes a big difference in his dryland summer crop acres. In this article from Farm Progress, Steinert talks about why he added more acres of no-till soybeans and why he still needs to do minimum tillage for his wheat crop.

Matt Steinert manages water in between flash droughts and rainfall on his Enid, Oklahoma, farms. Crop rotation, including double-crop soybeans, helps spread out peak water use.

No-Tillers Sweep 2022 Kentucky Wheat Yield Contest

No-tillers represented well in the 2022 Kentucky Wheat Yield Contest. The highest yield went to the no-till operation S & J Emmick of Hancock County, which harvested 132.68 bushels per acre. Rudy Hall, Tanner Shroup, Walnut Grove Farms and Peterson Farms, the four area winners, are all no-tillers as well. They reported yields ranging from 113.07-123.47. Congrats to a group that once again proves no-till doesn’t mean no yield!

2022 Kentucky Wheat Yield Contest Winners

‘It’s OK to Tell Someone How You’re Feeling’: Ohio No-Tiller Shares Mental Health Struggles to Help Other Farmers

Nathan Brown, a well-known Hillsboro, Ohio, no-tiller, started a recent field day in Indiana talking about a subject that came as a bit of a surprise to the audience: mental health. Brown says he’s struggled with his mental health over the past year after a friend died. He realized he needed to open up to his wife, family and doctor to start to get through it. “I learned it’s important to share with others. That’s why I agreed to talk about my own experiences. My going through it might help someone else.” Thank you, Nathan, for sharing your story and encouraging others to seek help if they need it. Anyone who’s looking for farmer-specific mental health resources can find some here.

Farmers at a field day thought Nathan Brown would talk about no-till strategy, but instead, he talked about the importance of mental health

Nod to Nebraska’s Ag Economy

On a lighter note, we gave Nebraskans a hard time about football season a couple of months ago, so we had to share when local Wisconsin boy Charlie Berens gives deserved props to the Cornhusker state in this new video series, Ag States of America. We’ll add that Nebraska is also #2 and #5 in no-till and cover crop acres, respectively.


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SOURCE by Sound Agriculture
           

 
“No-Till Farmer's Best of the Web"
is brought to you by Sound Agriculture.

More from this series

SOURCE by Sound Agriculture wakes up the soil microbiome so you can access more nitrogen and phosphorus from your field. This bioinspired chemistry fixes atmospheric nitrogen and unlocks phosphorus that is tied up in the soil. It’s like caffeine for microbes, working with the soil you’ve already got to make your season more productive. Learn more at www.sound.ag.