No-Till Roundtable: How do landlords feel about no-till in your area? And how do you overcome objections to no-till by landlords toward rented land?

A: Some land owners require it while others are just after the highest rent — even if that means rape-and-pillage of the soil. The rest don’t care. Three of the four people I rent from came to me because of my no-till and cover-crop practices. The other one was looking for a new tenant, and after I explained my practices they said I would be farming their ground before we even talked money. One farm was coming out of 10 years of native grass CRP and the owner said I was the only person that would no-till the first year.

— Roger Wenning, Greensburg, Ind.

A: A pure no-till lease is in effect at a few Pacific Northwest locations. Most of the leasing or renting is done on a moral commitment to no-till, especially if the ground is shallow or rock strewn. CRP takeout has been extremely prone to tillage, so it’s apparent that fertilizer dealers promote CRP takeout with their old-fashioned tillage equipment. Some landlords will moderately tolerate no-till and others absolutely will not allow it. The best way to get a lease in the Pacific Northwest is to prove you’re a good no-tiller and have the right equipment to do it.

— Guy Swanson, Spokane, Wash.

A: A couple of my landlords are rather awed by the fact you can plant through residue and have an ugly-looking field on April 25 and by…

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